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You can sponsor your spouse, partner or dependent child if:

  • You’re at least 18 years old
  • You’re a Canadian citizen, a permanent resident of Canada, or a person registered in Canada as an Indian under the Canadian Indian Act
    • If you’re a Canadian citizen living outside Canada, you must show that you plan to live in Canada when the persons you want to sponsor become permanent residents.
    • You can’t sponsor someone if you’re a permanent resident living outside Canada.
  • You’re able to prove that you’re not receiving social assistance for reasons other than a disability
  • You can provide for the basic needs of any persons you want to sponsor

You can contact us for Spouse Sponsorship Application, we are a team of expert Immigration Consultant in Kitchener Waterloo, Canada.

You can sponsor your own parents and grandparents if:

  • you’re at least 18 years old
  • you live in Canada
  • you’re a Canadian citizen, a permanent resident of Canada, or a person registered in Canada as an Indian under the Canadian Indian Act
  • you have enough money to support the persons you want to sponsor
    • To show that you have enough, you’ll have to provide your proof of income.

If you require help with Parents & Grandparents Application, You can contact us , we offer our expert Immigration Services in Kitchener Waterloo, Cambridge, Brampton, London, Hamilton in Canada.

You can sponsor certain relatives if you’re 18 years of age or older and a:

  • Canadian citizen or
  • person registered in Canada as an Indian under the Canadian Indian Act or
  • permanent resident of Canada

You must live in Canada to sponsor eligible relatives unless you:

  • are a Canadian citizen who lives abroad and
  • plan to return to Canada when your relatives immigrate and
    are sponsoring your:
    • spouse or
    • common-law or conjugal partner or
    • dependent children who have no dependent children

Your responsibilities

When you sponsor a relative to become a permanent resident of Canada, you must:

  • meet set income guidelines
  • agree in writing to give financial support to your relative and any other eligible relatives coming with them:
    • beginning on the date they become a permanent resident
    • for up to 20 years (depending on their age and how you’re related)

The person you sponsor must sign an agreement saying they will make the effort to support themselves. This includes sponsored dependent children 18 or older. Dependent children under 19 don’t have to sign this agreement.

Who you can sponsor

You can only sponsor relatives like a brother, sister, aunt or uncle in very specific situations. Depending on your situation, there are 2 options for who you can sponsor.

Orphaned brother, sister, nephew, niece or grandchild
You can sponsor an orphaned brother, sister, nephew, niece or grandchild only if they meet all of these conditions:

  • they’re related to you by blood or adoption
  • both their mother and father passed away
  • they’re under 18 years of age
  • they’re single (not married or in a common-law or conjugal relationship)

You can’t sponsor your brother, sister, nephew, niece or grandchild if:

  • one of their parents is still alive
  • no one knows where their parents are
  • their parents abandoned them
  • someone else other than their parents is taking care of them while one or both their parents are alive
  • their parent is in jail or otherwise detained

Other relative
You may sponsor one relative, related by blood or adoption, of any age, if you meet all of these conditions:

  • you (the person who wants to sponsor your relative) don't have a living relative you could sponsor instead, such as a:
    • spouse
    • common-law partner
    • conjugal partner
    • son or daughter
    • parent
    • grandparent
    • orphaned brother or sister
    • orphaned nephew or niece
    • orphaned grandchild
  • you (the potential sponsor) don’t have any relatives (aunt or uncle or any of the relatives listed above), who is a:
    • Canadian citizen
    • permanent resident
    • registered Indian under the Indian Act

If the relative you want to sponsor has a spouse, partner, or dependent children who will come with them to Canada, you must include them on the same sponsorship application.

Steed Immigration Services

There are two processes that you must go through when you adopt a child from another country: the adoption process and the immigration process.

The immigration process has two parts:

  • the application for sponsorship; and
  • the application for permanent residence for the child.

After your child arrives in Canada as a permanent resident, you can apply for citizenship on the child’s behalf. However, the adoption must be finalized before the child can be granted citizenship.

Requirements to sponsor a child
To sponsor a child from another country for adoption, you must:

  • be a Canadian citizen or a permanent resident (if you do not currently reside in Canada, you must do so when the adopted child becomes a permanent resident);
  • live in Canada; and
  • be at least 18 years old.

You may not be eligible to sponsor in some cases, such as:

  • if you did not meet the requirements of a previous sponsorship agreement;
  • if you defaulted on a court-ordered support order, such as alimony or child support;
  • if you have been convicted of a violent criminal offence—depending on the nature of the offence, when it occurred and whether a record suspension was granted; or
  • if you do not live in Canada now and do not plan to live full-time in Canada when the child becomes a permanent resident.

Requirements for intercountry adoption
Most intercountry adoptions will take place in the child’s home country. Each country has different laws and procedures covering adoption by foreigners. For instance, some countries allow adoptions outside the child’s home country, while others only permit adoption inside the country. Not all countries allow adoptions.

If you are adopting a child who is related to you, different rules from the provinces and/or the country of origin may apply.

The immigration process allows two types of adoptions of children under 18. Depending on the law of the child’s home country, the intercountry adoption must either:

  • be completed outside of Canada; or
  • be completed in Canada.

For Canadian immigration purposes, all intercountry adoptions must:

  • be legal in the child’s home country and in the province or territory where you live;
  • end the legal relationship between your adopted child and his or her biological parents;
  • meet the requirements of your province or territory, including a home study;
  • create a genuine parent–child relationship between you and the child;
  • be in the best interests of the child;
  • not be primarily to gain permanent resident status for the child in Canada.

Children adopted outside Canada may be sponsored to come to Canada if:

  • informed consent has been given by both of your child’s biological parents (if they are living).
  • your child has been legally adopted outside Canada.
  • the requirements of the Hague Convention have been met, if they apply.

Medical requirements
Adopted children must complete a medical exam before being issued a permanent resident visa. Your province or territory or a licensed adoption agency will tell you how and when it will take place. You must also sign a statement that you have obtained information regarding any medical conditions the child may have.

Intercountry adoption is complex. Other requirements may apply depending on the country from which you are adopting and your home province or territory.

Contact Steed Immigration, your Expert Canadian Immigration Consultant.